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Posted by on Sep 19, 2011 in Cooking recipe, Lovage, Onion |

Lovage Soup

I am eager to try this soup, it sounds delicious! Lovage Soup Ingredients: *2 tbsp. butter *2 medium onions, finely chopped *2 cups potatoes, peeled and diced *4 tbsp. finely chopped lovage leaves *3.5 cups chicken or vegetable stock *1 cup milk or cream *grated nutmeg, salt, and pepper Directions: 1) Melt the butter in a heavy pan and gently saute the onions and diced potatoes for 5 minutes until soft. 2) Add the chopped lovage leaves and cook for 1 minute. Pour in the stock, bring to a boil, season with salt and pepper, cover and simmer gently until the potatoes are soft (approx. 15 minutes) 3) Puree’ the soup with a food processor or blender and return to a pan. Blend in the milk or cream, sprinkle with nutmeg and heat through. Do not boil or the milk/cream will curdle! Adjust seasoning to taste.  Serve the soup either hot or cold. Enjoy! Recipe found in: Jekka McVicar, The Complete Herb Book, pg. 145....

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Posted by on Aug 28, 2011 in Herbs, Lovage |

Lovage

Lovage

Name: *Lovage (Levisticum officinale) Description: *hardy perennial plant, can grow up to 6 feet tall *best in zones 5-8 *closely related to both angelica and celery *dies down in the winter but comes back in early spring Parts Used: *leaves and stems, seeds, roots, both fresh or dried Position: *rich, moist well-drained soil *full sun to partial shade, but use light shade if summers are hot where you live Propagation: *you can propagated by seed: use cold stratification for 1-2 weeks, then sow indoors in seed flats/trays and transplant when plants are healthy and after frost danger *you can also propagate by division in spring Maintenance: *remove older, yellowing leaves throughout harvesting season to promote fresh growth *you can cut older plants down to about 1 foot high to encourage fresh foilage and growth in midsummer *give the plant plenty of compost for best flavor and health Harvesting: *For cooking, pick leaves as required *For medicinal purposes, pick the leaves before flowering *dig up roots in spring of fall...

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