Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Apr 4, 2016 in Headaches, Medicinal Recipe, Uncategorized | 4 comments

How to Make a Headache Salve

How to Make a Headache Salve

How to Make a Headache Salve I’ve mentioned it before (in my ‘about me‘ info, for example) that I’m one of those people who is prone to headaches. When the weather changes, when I eat too much processed foods, for my hormonal cycles, when I’m dehydrated, when it’s allergy season, when it’s too sunny, when my eyes are strained, when I’m stressed….yep, I get headaches for pretty much everything. It used to be pretty bad. In fact, I would have more days in a month WITH headaches than without.  However, as I wrote in my ‘15 Herbs for Headaches‘ post, I’ve found some amazing natural solutions that have made it so that I have very few serious headaches anymore. It’s not just herbal remedies, but it’s also things like eating Real Food, living a more stress-free lifestyle, and exercising. I also keep my natural medicine cabinet stocked with Feverfew tincture for any bad headaches or migraines. When I DO get a headache, I prefer to use every possible natural remedy/option possible ASAP. I...

Read More

Posted by on Nov 4, 2013 in Allspice, Anxiety/Nerves/Stress, Borage, Catnip, Chamomile, Feverfew, Headaches, Herbs, Horseradish, Lavender, Lemon Balm, Lemon Verbena, Passionflower, Rosemary, Sage, Skullcap, Valerian, Vervain | 19 comments

15 Herbs for Headaches

15 Herbs for Headaches

15 Herbs for Headaches Those that know me know that I have long been a sufferer of headaches. It seems like my body’s reaction to anything wrong is always in the form of a headache. Through the years, I have discovered certain herbs (okay, one is a spice) that have benefited me with my headache problems. It is important for headache sufferers to figure out what kind of headache you are having. Different herbs help with different types of headaches. For example, there are migraines, cluster headaches, tension/stress headaches, hormone headaches, food-triggered headaches, and the list goes on. I have included a list of what I consider the top 15 Herbs for Headaches. Feel free to leave a comment if you think that I missed an important one on the list: 1).  Allspice: This spice is an analgesic, which means it has a numbing effect on the nerves and gives relief from pains such as headaches and sinus problems. It is also a relaxant, and has a calming effect on...

Read More

Posted by on Sep 16, 2011 in Anxiety/Nerves/Stress, Headaches, Insomnia, Lemon Balm, Medicinal Recipe |

Medicinal Uses of Lemon Balm

Medicinal Uses of Lemon Balm

  Lemon balm is medicinally amazing for tension, restlessness, anxiety, headaches, and depression. Lemon balm helps promote a calming and relaxing feeling, so it is also good to take in addition to other herbs for insomnia. If taken as a herbal tea infusion for a long period of time, there should be wonderful results for uplifting the spirits. Herbal tea infusion with Lemon balm: *Infuse 2-3 teaspoons of the fresh lemon balm leaves (lemon balm does not dry well, it is best used fresh. If it is dried, use a similar dosage as the fresh) per 1 cup of boiling water. Steep for 15-20 minutes and strain. Drink 1 cup of the herbal tea 2-3 times per day. This herb has a mild sedative action, so if you are someone who often suffers from fatigue, it is best to take this only in the evening....

Read More

Posted by on Sep 16, 2011 in Anxiety/Nerves/Stress, Chamomile, First aid, Headaches, Indigestion, Insomnia, Medicinal Recipe |

Medicinal Uses of Chamomile

Medicinal Uses of Chamomile

  Chamomile’s highly scented flowers possess powerful antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties. If taken as an infused herbal tea, it can help with a number of problems: improving appetite, easing anxiety, lessening tension headaches, calming and healing the stomach after nausea, relaxing the body to get rid of insomnia issues, and calming children with teething problems. To make a Chamomile herbal tea infusion: Boil 1 cup of water per 1-3 tsp. dried chamomile or 1-3 tbsp. fresh chamomile. Let it steep for 15-20 minutes. Strain and drink 3 to 4 cups per day. Children over the age of 4 years can take a third to half of the adult dosage....

Read More

Posted by on Sep 16, 2011 in Anxiety/Nerves/Stress, First aid, Headaches, Lavender, Medicinal Recipe |

Medicinal Uses of Lavender

Medicinal Uses of Lavender

  The scent of lavender has long been known to promote relaxation. Inhaling lavender’s essential oils helps ease anxiety and improves feelings of calmness and well-being in stressful situations. Research also proves that lavender reduces the body’s production of the stress hormone called cortisol. Lavender can also be taken to get rid of stress-related headaches. To relieve anxiety and stress-related headaches: Buy a good quality Lavender essential oil (which is not for drinking but is for the outside of your body). Massage this essential oil into the shoulders and temples. Or, you can inhale the steam by putting 4 drops of the essential oil into 4 teaspoons of hot water. You can also put some drops of lavender essential oil into a hot bath and soak away the stress. You can also make a herbal tea infusion with the actual lavender plant. Pour 1 cup boiling water over each 1-3 tsp. dried lavender flowers OR 1-3 tbsp. fresh lavender flowers. Let it steep for 15-20 minutes. Strain and drink...

Read More

Posted by on Sep 15, 2011 in Anxiety/Nerves/Stress, First aid, Headaches, Insomnia, Medicinal Recipe, Valerian |

Valerian: good for the central nervous system

Valerian: good for the central nervous system

Valerian is a strong medicinal herb for the central nervous system. It is good as a sedative for insomnia, helps with sudden emotional distress, headaches, intestinal cramps, nervous exhaustion, and as a pain reliever. Since you use the root of Valerian for medicinal purposes, you do not make an infusion tea with it, but rather a decoction. To make a Valerian decoction, place 1-3 tsp. of the dried root in a small saucepan and over with cold water. Heat slowly and simmer, covered, for 20-45 minutes. The longer you simmer the herbs, the stronger the tea will be. Another option is that you can crush 1 tsp. of the dried root and soak it in cold water for 12-24 hours. Then drink....

Read More